Hot Photography Posts

How To: Make a glass positive/soft negative for Collodion

This shows the process of making a positive image on clear glass; traditionally, this would be called an Ambrotype. Here, it is a little bit overexposed to get a "soft negative" or a negative that can be used with modern silver paper (printing). Learn how to make a glass positive or soft negative picture with the Collodion printing technique by watching this video photography tutorial.

How To: Creatively document events with photography

In this video sequence, learn how to choose a context when shooting and editing your photos, allowing themes to emerge in your narrative work. By simply documenting the events around you, you will find ways to creatively show what happens through photography. Documenting events will not only make your photography work more interesting, you will also become a better story teller. Practice grouping photographs to tell a story.

How To: Build a Double-Shoulder Camera Mount for Only $8 Using PVC

Shoulder mounts are great for stability, but they can be pretty pricey. This DIY project by TheJamesTheatre is better in both aspects—it rests on both shoulders for extra stability, and it only costs 8 bucks to make. The frame is made of PVC with foam pieces from a pool noodle for cushion. All you need is a few connectors and the nuts and bolts to put it all together. You can find the full parts list on the About section on YouTube.

How To: Make a 50mm Lens into a Tilt Lens Using a Shower Head

There are so many ways to modify your camera using common household items, like clothes hangers, an umbrella, or even a jar of peanut butter. Here's a new, unexpected addition to the list—a shower head. Maciej Pietuszynski came up with this brilliant camera mod, which uses a shower head to turn an old 50mm lens into a DIY tilt lens. This trick works by using the part from the shower head that allows you to adjust the angle. You'll have to take apart the lens and cut the shower head in half. T...

How To: Develop black and white film in the dark room

Developing black-and-white film is an arcane, but very rewarding and useful process if you want to make really good-looking prints from your film. This two-part video goes over the entire process, from chemical measurement and selection to the actual process of developing the film. A must-watch for any would-be film photographer.

How To: Turn a Canvas Messenger Bag into a Water-Resistant Waxed Camera Case

If you take your camera equipment with you on a pretty frequent basis, having a camera bag can help protect it and makes it much easier to keep everything in one place. A good camera bag can be pretty expensive, but with this tutorial by photographer Allen Mowery, you can turn a cheap canvas messenger bag into a nice looking DIY waxed camera bag for half the price. For this project, you'll need a canvas messenger bag, a camera insert, and some paraffin wax, which can be found in the canning a...

How To: Do night photography with your kids

In this video, we learn how to do night photography with your kids. Glow sticks. flash lights, and ghost images are great for night time! First, put your camera in the manual mode and then learn how to set the shutter once you're in manual mode. Put the pop up flash on your camera, then get started taking pictures! Use glow sticks to take pictures of the children, giving a cool effect on the photos. Use different shutter speeds on the camera to capture the sparks on the glow sticks and with s...

How To: Use an old flash on a new digital camera

Old camera equipment like flashes and lenses are often praised by modern photographers, but getting them integrated into new digital photography setups can be a challenge. This video will show you some tips for using old flashes with new digital cameras, including a great trick for making your digital camera recognize the flash by covering one specific contact. Don't get a new flash, use an old one with the skills you learn in this video.

How To: Use long exposure photography to paint with sparklers

Long exposure photography has long allowed photographers to do amazing things with light. Now you can do that! This video will show you how to use a long exposure, sparklers, and Photoshop to create amazing psychedelic art on your photographs. This new art form is called light painting or light writing, looks amazing, and is pretty easy to get started doing. Do it!

How To: Use a Polaris incident light meter

In this Fine Art video tutorial you will learn how to use a Polaris incident light meter. The meter has a power, mode, ISO control and a multi flash exposure buttons. On the side you have the up / down and the trigger buttons. Power on the light meter. Select the mode, say ambient light and then set the ISO by pressing the ISO button and the up/down button. Now using only the up/down button, set the shutter speed. Then place the meter under your chin to meter the light on your face. Press the...

How To: Tilt-shift photography to create a miniature effect

Kipkay from Make Magazine shows us how to create a photographic illusion, making things look smaller than they really are with tilt-shift photography. Materials needed include rubber plunger, an oversized lens, a plastic body cap, a single lens (or digital single lens) camera, a hot glue gun, a sanding file, and a disposable object for a plastic backing, such as a VHS tape case. With this great tutorial and a little work, create the illusion of a miniaturized world with this photographic tech...

How To: Use Nikon's metering system for photo cameras

This instructional photography video explains the basics on how to use all three different types of metering systems on Nikon D-SLR photo cameras: 3D Matrix Metering, Center-Weight Metering, and Spot Metering. Watch this tutorial and start taking better, more professional photographs now that you understand how to use the metering system.

How To: Prepare a photography portfolio presentation

Putting together a print portfolio for your photography? This instructional photography video provides some suggestions on photographic portfolios and how to assemble a portfolio. It is very important to have a good online presence, a nice gallery of your work to show. But there are advantages to having a print portfolio as well.

How To: Photograph from the sky with a homemade balloon

In this video, you will find some tips on making an aerial camera to take footage from the sky. To make your own aerial camera, you will need to follow these steps: Buy some metalized nylon from balloon kits.com. Use a hot iron to see the nylon pieces together. Check for any air leaks by using a shop vac's exhaust. Patch any holes with extra nylon or duct tape. Fill the balloon with helium. Attach a box to the balloon with some mesh tape. This box will hold your camera. Allow friends to hold ...

How To: Make a cyanotype

This lesson is the second of a series exploring alternative process photography. In this lesson, learn how to create a Cyanotype using a digital negative. Step by step instructions are included with samples and illustrations. Follow along with this photo lesson and learn how to recreate this old-fashioned print technique. You'll need a cyanotype kit, a fine bristled paint brush, a watercolor rag, a contact printer, a pair of clamps, a large tray, a UV light source, and a digital negative.

How To: Varnish wet plate Collodion images

This video shows the process of varnishing a black glass Ambrotype. Not a high "wow-factor" here, but some practical knowledge needed in the process. It's very important to varnish wet plate images as they damage and tarnish easily. Learn how to varnish Collodion pictures by watching this video photography tutorial.

How To: Use fill flash to get blue skies

In this tutorial, we learn how to use fill flash to get blue skies. If you take a picture of someone in front of a blue sky, they will most likely have shadows on their face, making the sky look good and them look bad. If you change your flash, the sky will look pure white and the person will look good. To change this, put a flash onto the camera, then use the exposure compensation to -1. Then, adjust your flash exposure to 2 2/3 and take the picture of the subject again. Now, you will have a...

How To: Add Creepy Apparitions to Your Halloween Photos Using the Pepper's Ghost Illusion

Photographers have been using the Pepper's Ghost Illusion for over a century to play up the level of creepiness in their photos. Many of the pictures that claim to be real "sightings" use this technique to project a ghostly figure into the background of their images. Today, it's still used in theatre, "scary" rides at amusement parks, and haunted houses all over the world, which makes it a great photography trick for Halloween time. As shown in the tutorial below by Make's Jason Poel Smith, t...