How To: Take UV Pictures

This video will show you how you can take UV (ultraviolet) pictures with any basic camera. In a few easy steps, you too can be seeing the world in a whole new way.

How To: Make a Super Cheap Pinhole Lens Filter for Your DSLR Camera

There are tons of ways to make your own pinhole camera out of everything from a juice box to a pine nut. If you have a DSLR, you can make a DIY pinhole lens for it for just a few bucks. David O'Sullivan over on DIY Photography made this one using a cheap body cap and an aluminum can. Here's how to make your own. David put up a template you can follow to make things easier, so start off by downloading it, then use a ruler to draw a line directly through the center of the body cap. Cut out the ...

How To: Use a UV or haze filter for SLR cameras

As any SLR or DSLR owner knows all too well, the price of lenses can often approach or even exceed the cost of your camera. As such, it's important that you take the necessary precautions to protect them. With this free photographer's guide, you'll learn about using UV (that is, ultra-violet) filters to protect your single lens-reflex camera lenses from sun damage.

How To: Set the shutter speed and aperture of a camera

When setting the shutter speed and aperture of a camera, use a light meter to take a reading, then set the aperture or shutter speed, depending on which is more important for the photograph. Set the shutter speed and aperture of a camera with the tips in this free instructional video on photography tips from a professional photographer. For novice photographers, setting the shutter speed and aperture is an important first step in mastering the art of photography.

How To: Take photographs like Gregory Crewdson

In this Ovation TV original special, acclaimed photographer Gregory Crewdson shares with us his insight into his photographic techniques. Like a film, he uses a lot of production, a lot of lighting, a lot of set design. He is an American photographer best known for elaborately staged, surreal scenes of American homes and neighborhoods. Learn how to take pictures like this master artist.

How To: Repair a Lomography Diana camera shutter

If your film camera shutter has stopped working, chances are that the shutter spring has become detached. This photography tutorial shows you how to disassemble the Lomography Diana Plus shutter assembly and re-attach the spring. You will need a small screwdriver to make this camera repair.

How To: Make a Mini DIY Camera Tripod Using Old Disposable Razors

Choosing the right tripod stand can be a difficult decision, but if you want to avoid the hassle and save some money, making your own easy to use tripod can be the best way to go. If this tennis ball tripod isn't right for you, then maybe this disposable razors one by Instructables user Jawasan will do. This tripod stand only works for small cameras, so make sure yours is light enough before you start.

How To: Take photos of floating / flying / levitating people

Do you believe you can fly? Or at least, believe that you can take pictures where it looks like you or other people are flying? Or at least jumping really high? This video will show you how to take pictures of flying, floating, levitating, or high-jumping people using a digital camera, tripod, stool, and photo editing software like Photoshop or GIMP. Either way, the effect is surprisingly easy to create and can help you make some really amazing photos.

How To: Load film into a Hasselblad back

This is a how-to video featuring the A12 film back for a Hasselblad 500 series camera. Watch this photography tutorial to begin using your antique Hasselblad camera and all of its confusing parts. Once you are aware of the unique film loading process for this camera, you can adopt this camera into your photography practice and begin shooting.

How To: Take multiplicity or sequence photographs

Multiplicity photography is a type of photography where you take multiple images of the same subject in different parts of the same frame, then combine them digitally to create a photo with multiple different images of the same person, animal, or object in the same setting. This is also called sequence photography when it's used in sports. This video will show you how to do it with a digital camera and Photoshop, creating amazingly cool-looking results.

How To: Replace focusing screens on Canon EOS cameras

In this Fine Art video tutorial you will learn how to replace focusing screens on Canon EOS cameras. The EOS 40D, like the EOS 5D and EOS 1 series of digital cameras has a user replaceable focusing screen. With the EOS 40D, you have the option of Ef D and the Ef S focusing screens. To replace the focusing screen, use the tool provided with kit supplied with the screen. The tool has a hook at one end and a spring loaded grip at the other end. Use the hook to lift the latch of the focusing scre...

How To: Develop C41 black and white or color film at home

With photo labs around the world closing in the wake of the digital camera revolution, knowing how to develop your own film at home is more important than ever. This video teaches you how to develop one type of film, C41, at home using a kit. Even when there are no more photo labs left, you will still be able to make beautiful still prints from film at home after watching this video.

How To: Turn an Old Kit Lens into a DSLR Macro Lens in Five Minutes

There are tons of ways to make a macro lens for your smartphone, but if you need one for a DSLR, it's not quite as simple as using a magnifying glass or a drop of water. If you have an old kit lens, though, you can turn it into a macro lens in no time—all you have to do is remove the front element. For this hack, Juha Loukola over on PetaPixel used a Canon 38-76mm lens, but says that the process should be pretty much the same for other lenses.

How To: Make a wide-mouthed screaming face in Photoshop

Munch's The Scream is one of the world's most famous paintings, and at least since it was painted people have had a fascination with images of larger-than-life mouths screaming. This video will show you how to use Photoshop to create some cool screaming face effects, like making the mouth huge and distorted or even making it cover the entire face! The effects are cool and easy, so try it!

How To: Take a picture of an exploding water balloon

Fine tune your photography skills with this video lesson on how to take a picture of an exploding water balloon. You'll see what equipment you'll need, like cameras, lights, flashes, etc. Pixel Catcher shows you how. It's a matter of perfection, so check out this video to see how to take that photo of exploding water balloons. You could apply this principal to any photograph!

How To: Use a Holga camera

Here are some tips about the Holga camera. The Holga is a plastic camera that takes unique, distorted pictures. This instructional photography video is good for people who just got their Holga camera and want to learn some photographer's tricks.

How To: Make a glass positive/soft negative for Collodion

This shows the process of making a positive image on clear glass; traditionally, this would be called an Ambrotype. Here, it is a little bit overexposed to get a "soft negative" or a negative that can be used with modern silver paper (printing). Learn how to make a glass positive or soft negative picture with the Collodion printing technique by watching this video photography tutorial.

How To: Add Creepy Apparitions to Your Halloween Photos Using the Pepper's Ghost Illusion

Photographers have been using the Pepper's Ghost Illusion for over a century to play up the level of creepiness in their photos. Many of the pictures that claim to be real "sightings" use this technique to project a ghostly figure into the background of their images. Today, it's still used in theatre, "scary" rides at amusement parks, and haunted houses all over the world, which makes it a great photography trick for Halloween time. As shown in the tutorial below by Make's Jason Poel Smith, t...

How To: Create a Light Painting Vortex Using a DIY Reusable Steel Wool Cage

There's no shortage of uses for steel wool, but the majority of them tend to be on the pyromaniacal side, like DIY fireworks. This trick by Mike Mikkelson is no different—it uses a homemade reusable "wool cage" to create a spinning vortex of light, like in the photo below. You can do this with just a piece of steel wool on a cable, but Michael wanted something he could easily reuse no matter how many shots he took, so he built a small cage to house the steel wool out of chicken wire, a small ...

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